Tabella di Comparazione tra Lampade a Icandescenza Fluorescenti e LED

Illuminazione a Confronto: LED vs Fluorescente CFL

tabella di comparazione tra lampade a incandescenza fluorescenti e led

Vi siete mai chiesti cosa c’è di meglio: lampade Fluorescenti (comprese le lampade Fluorescenti Compatte o Cfl) o Diodi Emettitori di Luce (Led)? Bene, qui è un testa a testa di confronto tra i due, seguita da una discussione approfondita di ogni tecnologia, a sua volta.

lampadine a led da 100 watt

Fluorescente vs LED Confronto:

Topic LED Notes Fluorescent Notes Winner
Correlated Color Temperature (read more here) LEDs are available in a wide range of color temperatures that generally span from 2200K-6000K (ranging from yellow to light blue). Fluorescent light is available in a range of CCT values that can be adjusted by changing the amount of phosphor inside the bulb. Typical values range between warm white at 2700K to daylight at 6500K depending on the lighting requirement.
CRI (read more here) CRI for LED is highly dependent on the particular light in question. That said, a very broad spectrum of CRI values is available ranging generally from 65-95. Typical CRI values for fluorescent light are between 62 and 80. This is fairly good color rendering but it leaves some room for improvement when compared to LED. LED
Cycling (Turning On/Off) LEDs are an ideal light for purposely turning on and off because they respond rather instantaneously (there is no warm up or cool down period). They produce steady light without flicker. Fluorescent lights exhibit a short delay when turning on. Older fluorescent models actually required a significant warm-up period before the tube would light but this has been significantly improved with newer, rapid-start fluorescent lights. Possible failures or delays in the start-up process are typically due to faulty starters, transformers, or  ballast. Fluorescent bulbs may also flicker, display swirling or pink light, light at the ends of the tube only, or cycle on and off as the bulb reaches the end of its useful life. LED
Dimming LEDs are very easy to dim and options are available to use anywhere from 100% of the light to 0.5%. LED dimming functions by either lowering the forward current or modulating the pulse duration. Newer CFL bulbs can be dimmed very effectively (down to about 15% of their normal light) while older fluorescent bulbs are often not suitable for dimming. If looking to dim a fluorescent bulb make sure that you choose a ballast that is rated for dimming. LED
Directionality LEDs emit light for 180 degrees. This is typically an advantage because light is usually desired over a target area (rather than all 360 degrees around the bulb). You can read more about the impact of directional lighting by learning about  a measurement called “useful lumens” or “system efficiency.” Fluorescent light is omnidirectional meaning it emits light for 360 degrees, requiring fixture housings or reflectors to direct the emitted light. LED
Efficiency LEDs are very efficient relative to every lighting type on the market. Typical source efficiency ranges 37 and 120 lumens/watt. Where LEDs really shine, however, is in their system efficiency (the amount of light that actually reaches the target area after all losses are accounted for). Most values for LED system efficiency fall above 50 lumens/watt. Fluorescent and CFL lights are very efficient compared to incandescent lights (50-100 lumens/watt source efficiency). They lose out to LEDs principally because their system efficiency is much lower (<30 lumens/watt) due to all of the losses associated with omnidirectional light output and the need to redirect it to a desired area. LED
Efficiency Droop LED efficiency drops as current increases. Heat output also increases with additional current which decreases the lifetime of the device. The overall performance drop is relatively low, however, when compared to fluorescent lights. Fluorescent lights also experience efficiency losses as the device ages and additional current is required to achieve the same lighting output. Efficiency losses are greater and the degradation time shorter in the case of fluorescent bulbs. LED
Emissions LEDs produce a very narrow spectrum of visible light without the losses to irrelevant radiation types (IR or UV) associated with conventional lighting, meaning that most of the energy consumed by the light source is converted directly to visible light. Fluorescent lights actually produce primarily UV radiation. They generate visible light because the bulb is coated with a layer of phosphor which glows when it comes into contact with UV radiation. Roughly 15% of the emissions are lost due to energy dissipation and heat. LED
Infrared None None
Ultraviolet None Fluorescent lights produce primarily UV radiation. They generate visible light because the bulb is coated with a layer of phosphor which glows when it comes into contact with UV radiation. Although most UV radiation stays within the bulb, some does escape into the environment which can potentially be a hazard. LED
Failure Characteristics LEDs fail by dimming gradually over time. Fluorescent lights can fail in a number of different ways. Generally they exhibit an end-of-life phenomenon known as cycling where the lamp goes on and off without human input prior to eventually failing entirely. LED
Foot Candles (read more here) Foot candle is a measure that describes the amount of light reaching a specified surface area as opposed to the total amount of light coming from a source (luminous flux). LEDs are very efficient relative to every lighting type on the market. Typical source efficiency ranges 37 and 120 lumens/watt. Where LEDs really shine, however, is in their system efficiency (the amount of light that actually reaches the target area after all losses are accounted for). Most values for LED system efficiency fall above 50 lumens/watt. Foot candle is a measure that describes the amount of light reaching a specified surface area as opposed to the total amount of light coming from a source (luminous flux). Fluorescent and CFL lights are very efficient compared to incandescent lights (50-100 lumens/watt source efficiency). They lose out to LEDs principally because their system efficiency is much lower (<30 lumens/watt) due to all of the losses associated with omnidirectional light output and the need to redirect it to a desired area. LED
Heat Emissions LEDs emit very little forward heat. The only real potential downside to this is when LEDs are used for outdoor lighting in wintery conditions. Snow falling on traditional lights like HID will melt when it comes into contact with the light. This is usually overcome with LEDs by covering the light with a visor or facing the light downward towards the ground. Fluorescent lights emit heat that is LED
absorbed by the ballast and/or lost to the environment. Roughly 15% of the emissions are lost due to energy dissipation and heat losses. In some circumstances heat emissions could be beneficial, however, it is a generally a bad thing to emit heat as it represents an energy inefficiency. The ultimate purpose of the device is to emit light, not heat.
Lifespan LEDs last longer than any light source commercially available on the market. Lifespans are variable but typical values range from 25,000 hours to 200,000 hours or more before a lamp or fixture requires replacement. Fluorescent lights have good lifespan relative to some bulbs but not compared to LED. Typical lifespan values range from 7,000 hours to 15,000 hours before a bulb requires replacement. Note: sometimes fluorescent lights need to be changed out before the end of their useful life to preempt serious degradation effects like flicker or changing light color (turning pink). LED
Lifetime Costs LED lighting has relatively high initial costs and low lifetime costs. The technology pays the investor back over time (the payback period). The major payback comes primarily from reduced maintenance costs over time (dependent on labor costs) and secondarily from energy efficiency improvements (dependent on electricity costs). Fluorescent lights are relatively cheap to purchase but relatively expensive to maintain. Fluorescent bulbs will likely need to be purchased several times and the associated labor costs will need to be paid in order to attain the equivalent lifespan of a single LED light. LED
Maintenance Costs LED has virtually zero maintenance costs and the frequency with which bulbs have to be changed out is by far the best on the market. Fluorescent bulbs require regular relamping and ballast replacement in addition to the labor cost to monitor and replace aging or expired components. LED
Upfront Costs LED light costs are high but variable depending on the specifications. The typical 100W-equivalent LED light costs somewhere between $10 and $20. Fluorescent and CFL bulb costs depend on the specific type of light. Generally they are cheap compared to LED ($3-$10 for a 100W incandescent-equivalent CFL bulb). Fluorescent tubes vary widely depending on the specific technology (prices between $2 and $30 are typical for the same rating discussed above). Fluorescent
Shock Resistance LEDs are solid state lights (SSLs) that are difficult to damage with physical shocks. Fluorescent bulbs are particularly fragile – especially T5, T8, and T12 tubes. Perhaps more importantly, broken fluorescent bulbs require special handling and disposal due to hazardous materials like mercury inside the lights. LED
Size LEDs can be extremely small (less than 2mm in some cases) and they can be scaled to a much larger size. All in all this makes the applications in which LEDs can be used extremely diverse. Compact Fluorescent Lights (CFLs) are designed to be small (such that they can replace an incandescent household light). Even so, they typically aren’t produced below roughly a centimeter in width. Standard fluorescent tubes are bulky and fragile at the same time. Neither compare to the small size and robust build of a solid state light like LED. LED
Temperature Tolerance
Cold Tolerance Minus 40 Degrees Celsius (and they will turn on instantaneously). Fluorescent lights with regular magnetic ballasts (such as the T12 tube) is not generally recommended for temperatures below 50-60 Degrees Fahrenheit. For colder weather choose a fluorescent light with an electronic ballast such as a T8 tube. LED
Heat Tolerance 100 Degrees Celsius. LEDs are fine for all normal operating temperatures both indoors and outdoors. They do, however, show degraded performance at significantly high temperatures and they require significant heat sinking, especially when in proximity to other sensitive components. We couldn’t find any objective data on fluorescent bulb performance in high temperature situations. If you have any information please contact us. 
Warm-Up Time LEDs have virtually no warm-up time. They reach maximum brightness near instantaneously. Fluorescent lights (particularly the older technology) requires a noticeable warm-up time that varies depending on the light. LED
Warranty Often 5 to 10 years. Typically 1-2 years. LED
Wintery Weather Conditions LEDs produce significantly less heat than conventional gas discharge lights.  This is typically a positive, however, for the unique case of application with traffic lights, there is a small potential that snow can accumulate on the bulbs. In reality, however, this is generally not an issue due to the use of visors and/or proper orientation of the light within a fixture that shields it from the elements. Fluorescent bulbs are not generally recommended for outdoor lighting. CFLs will work but as the temperature drops the light quality suffers significantly. This is noticeable slightly below the freezing level and dramatic below about 5 degrees Fahrenheit. LED
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